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Nov. 5, 2012 - Jan.9, 2013 Creations of Tides and Time - the Barrier Islands at the Annette Howell Turner Center for the Arts, Valdosta, Georgia
exhibit card for Valdosta exhibit

Reception November 5, 5-7 pm


Creations of Tide and Time features paintings by Brenda Hofreiter, Nancy Moskovitz, and Mary Jane Volkmann. All 3 were artists in residence, at different times, on Sapelo Island, Georgia. All 3 are enjoyed a second residency in September 2010 to further explore the ecosystem and paint together.

Annette Howell Turner Center for the Arts, located in Valdosta, GA.  229-247-ARTS (2787)


527 N Patterson St
Valdosta, GA 31601


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Barrier Islands are critically important environments and hug the eastern coastline from New York around the gulf into Texas.  Fed by nutrients carried by rivers to the sea and supported by sand washing from one island to the next, they drift slowly through geologic time on currents born from the spin of the planet.  Barrier Islands absorb the first and worst costal impacts from storm surge and high tides.  They are one of the most biologically productive habitats on earth, and their abundant decaying matter supports the base of the marine food web. They provide abundant nursery grounds for most of our seafood.  Their associated salt marshes filter the inland run off water helping to remove pollutants and excess nutrient before they enter the ocean.   The bacteria that live in the mud flats provide sulphur, a basic building block of live, providing balance in global atmospheric chemistry and climate . 

 

The paintings in this exhibit depict barrier islands of the Southeast from their shorelines to their interiors.  Twice a day tides reach nearly 8 feet as they wash the island’s broad beaches.  Beyond the beaches, dunes of fine white sand are formed by the wind and held in place by pioneer vegetation – sea oats, railroad vine and panic grass creating perfect nesting sites for shore birds and sea turtles.  Inland, anchored by older settled sand majestic live oaks, festooned with resurrection ferns and Spanish moss stand beside stately fanned palms and fragrant magnolia.   The inland forests dense canopies and deep- layered floor defy fire.  Nearby, sky-scraping pines reach their needle and cone-bearing branches to the sun, while dense thickets of saw-tooth palmetto cover their bases.  On the backside of the islands endless stretches of saltwater marsh serve as a nursery to abundant and varied sea life, and as feeding grounds for wading birds, otter, raccoon and mink.


“Sculpted by waves, wind and salt, barrier islands are beloved for their beauty, but also support unique flora and fauna and play a critical role in protecting the mainland from storms,”  said Darcie MacMahon, Florida Museum assistant director for Exhibits at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, FL , …”this exhibit inspires viewers to admire and then look deeper to discover the significance of the barrier islands to our lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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